Slowing ocean current caused by melting Antarctic ice could have drastic climate impact, study says  The GuardianView Full coverage on Google News
The Southern Ocean overturning circulation has ebbed 30% since the 90s, CSIRO scientist claims, leading to higher sea levels and changing weather

Slowing ocean current caused by melting Antarctic ice could have drastic climate impact, study says | Science | The Guardian

These deep ocean tides supply almost half of the world's oceans with vital nutrients and oxygen, but melting ice shelves are slowing them down.

Antarctic currents supplying 40% of world's deep ocean with nutrients and oxygen slowing dramatically | Live Science

The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) and Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) contribute largely to global mean sea level (GMSL) changes, though the seas surrounding the Antarctic like the Bellinghausen-Amundsen Seas and ...

Why Antarctic ice shelves are losing their mass and how it leads to global sea level rise

Climate Council on Twitter: "Our critical ecosystems are in the firing line of climate change. We must drastically step up efforts to cope with the impacts we are experiencing today, and do everything possible to get emissions down fast. https://t.co/vjPGP1jxtZ" / Twitter

Dr. Aaron Thierry on Twitter: "“We’re seeing changes have already happened in the ocean that were not projected to happen until a few decades from now" - Dr Steve Rintoul. CSIRO. #FasterThanExpected https://t.co/VAmiZX9lPN" / Twitter

Australian Conservation Foundation on Twitter: "Slowing ocean currents caused by melting Antarctic ice could have drastic consequences for Earth’s climate, sea level and marine life... https://t.co/4nAFrhrXfK" / Twitter

Mikko Tuomi @mustapipa@scicomm.xyz on Twitter: "A major global deep ocean current has slowed down by approximately 30% since the 1990s as a result of melting Antarctic ice, which could have critical consequences for Earth’s climate patterns and sea levels. https://t.co/xusLORdifk" / Twitter

Scientists have detected a 30% slowdown of the deep ocean currents that form in Antarctica, with profound consequences for Earth’s climate, sea level and marine life.

Antarctic alarm bells: observations reveal deep ocean currents are slowing earlier than predicted

Scientists examining the impact of climate change in Antarctica say there has been a 30 per cent drop-off in deep water circulation since the 1990s.Scientists examining the impact of climate change in Antarctica say there has been a 30 per cent drop-off in deep water circulation since the 1990s.

Climate change slowing Antarctica's deep, dense waters | Countryman

Amazon Price Tracker - Chrome Extension