1. Water, sanitation, hygiene, and waste management for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, Interim guidance (29 July 2020) - World  ReliefWeb
  2. Scared That Covid-19 Immunity Won’t Last? Don’t Be  The New York Times
  3. New Evidence Suggests Young Children Spread Covid-19 More Efficiently Than Adults  Forbes
  4. We thought COVID-19 was just a respiratory virus—we were wrong  Medical Xpress
  5. Concerns about Waning COVID-19 Immunity Are Likely Overblown  Scientific American
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
English Manual and Guideline on World about Health, Water Sanitation Hygiene and Epidemic; published on 29 Jul 2020 by UNICEF and WHOEnglish Manual and Guideline on World about Health, Water Sanitation Hygiene and Epidemic; published on 29 Jul 2020 by UNICEF and WHO

Water, sanitation, hygiene, and waste management for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, Interim guidance (29 July 2020) - World | ReliefWeb

Two new studies from different parts of the world arrived at the same conclusion: that young children not only transmit SARS-CoV-2 efficiently, but may be major drivers of the pandemic as well. Two new studies from different parts of the world arrived at the same conclusion: that young children not only transmit SARS-CoV-2 efficiently, but may be major drivers of the pandemic as well.

New Evidence Suggests Young Children Spread Covid-19 More Efficiently Than Adults

The decline seen in some studies is normal, experts say. But scientists must wait to see whether infection confers long-term protectionThe decline seen in some studies is normal, experts say. But scientists must wait to see whether infection confers long-term protection

Concerns about Waning COVID-19 Immunity Are Likely Overblown - Scientific American

In late January, when hospitals in the United States confirmed the presence of the novel coronavirus, health workers knew to watch for precisely three symptoms: fever, cough, and shortness of breath. ...

We thought COVID-19 was just a respiratory virus—we were wrong

Dropping antibody counts aren’t a sign that our immune system is failing against the coronavirus, nor an omen that we can’t develop a viable vaccine.Dropping antibody counts aren’t a sign that our immune system is failing against the coronavirus, nor an omen that we can’t develop a viable vaccine.

Here are the COVID-19 vaccine prospects that have made it to phase three trials and beyond.Here are the COVID-19 vaccine prospects that have made it to phase three trials and beyond.

Dozens of COVID-19 vaccines are in development. Here are the ones to follow.

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One of the greatest struggles of the COVID-19 pandemic has been the fact that the entire world has to watch the normal scientific process happen in realtime. Scientists don’t have the space t…

The most comprehensive and accessible explanation of how COVID-19 works (so far) / Boing Boing

The SARS-CoV-2 lineage circulated in bats for 50 or 60 years before jumping to humans at the end of last year, a new study finds.Dozens of other unknown bat coronavirus could be capable of infecting humans.

Ancestors of coronavirus have been hiding out in bats for decades, ready to infect humans | Live Science

The mounting evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2 can infect immune privileged sites and, from there, result in chronic persistent — but not latent — infectionsThe mounting evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2 can infect immune privileged sites and, from there, result in chronic persistent — but not latent — infections

Does coronavirus linger in the body? What we know about how viruses in general hang on in the brain and testicles

Genome sequencing of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreaks is valuable for tracing the sources and perhaps for drawing lessons about preventing future outbreaks. Genomic analysis by Deng et al. revealed that Northern California experienced a complex series of introductions of the virus, deriving not only from state-to-state transmission but also from international travel by air and ship. The study highlights the importance of being able to rapidly test and trace contacts of positive cases to enable swift control. Science , this issue p. [582][1] The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread globally, with >365,000 cases in California as of 17 July 2020. We investigated the genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 in Northern California from late January to mid-March 2020, using samples from 36 patients spanning nine counties and the Grand Princess cruise ship. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the cryptic introduction of at least seven different SARS-CoV-2 lineages into California, including epidemic WA1 strains associated with Washington state, with lack of a predominant lineage and limited transmission among communities. Lineages associated with outbreak clusters in two counties were defined by a single base substitution in the viral genome. These findings support contact tracing, social distancing, and travel restrictions to contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in California and other states. [1]: /lookup/doi/10.1126/science.abb9263

Genomic surveillance reveals multiple introductions of SARS-CoV-2 into Northern California | Science

A study published yesterday in Nature Microbiology suggests the viral lineage leading to the novel coronavirus—SARS-CoV-2—might have been “circulating unnoticed in bats for decades.”A study published yesterday in Nature Microbiology suggests the viral lineage leading to the novel coronavirus—SARS-CoV-2—might have been “circulating unnoticed in bats for decades.”

The virus that causes COVID-19 has been silently brewing in bats for decades | Popular Science

Most viruses produce a long-lasting memory in a person’s immune system, but this is not always the case, says an observer.Most viruses produce a long-lasting memory in a person’s immune system, but this is not always the case, says an observer.

Commentary: Booster shots will likely be needed even if a COVID-19 vaccine is ready - CNA

One in three people with no prior exposure to SARS-CoV-2 have T-helper cells that recognize the virus, which may be due to prior coronavirus infections.One in three people with no prior exposure to SARS-CoV-2 have T-helper cells that recognize the virus, which may be due to prior coronavirus infections.

Past Coronavirus Infections May Leave behind T Cells That Recognize SARS-CoV-2

Dealers in Kenya’s popular second-hand clothes market are pushing the government to lift a ban on imports. Do they have their facts right?Dealers in Kenya’s popular second-hand clothes market are pushing the government to lift a ban on imports. Do they have their facts right?

Can coronavirus only live up to 9 days on objects, as Kenyan traders claim? | Africa Check

T cells could be valuable allies in pandemic control Protective and enduring immune responses to viral infections or vaccines usually arise from the combined actions of lymphocytes: B cells (responsible for humoral antibody immunity) and T cells (responsible for cellular immunity and helping B cell responses). B cells produce detectable antibodies in classes IgM, IgG, and IgA along with lesser amounts of IgD and IgE. For SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of covid-19, the focus is mainly on IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies that can neutralise the virus by binding to the spike and other membrane proteins and thus preventing infection.1 Understanding the lesser known roles of T cells and cellular immunity will deepen our insights into covid-19 pathogenesis and help inform both vaccine development and pandemic containment strategies. An effective immune response to SARS-CoV-2 involves four types or subsets of T cells: T helper cells (CD4) are responsible for cellular immunity and for helping B cells to produce neutralising antibodies; cytotoxic or killer T cells (CD8) directly kill infected cells—aided by helper T cells2; …

Cellular immune responses to covid-19 | The BMJ

A new study by Penn State scientists claims the pandemic-causing coronavirus may have first evolved in bats way back in 1948.A new study by Penn State scientists claims the pandemic-causing coronavirus may have first evolved in bats way back in 1948.

Study Claims Coronavirus May Have First Evolved In Bats In 1948

The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen -- possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that person does get Covid-19, a new study suggests.The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen -- possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that person does get Covid-19, a new study suggests.

Why some people who haven't had COVID-19 might already have some immunity - Citizentv.co.ke

The development of a safe and effective vaccine will likely be required to end the COVID-19 pandemic. A group of scientists, led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) immunologist Dan H. Barouch, ...

Single-shot COVID-19 vaccine protects non-human primates

COVID-19’s effects on the body are much more complex (and potentially destructive) than that, UCSF doctors say.COVID-19’s effects on the body are much more complex (and potentially destructive) than that, UCSF doctors say.

We thought it was just a respiratory virus. We were wrong. | University of California

When SARS-CoV-2 infects us, the infected body cells release messenger substances known as type 1 interferons. These attract our killer cells, which kill the infected cells.When SARS-CoV-2 infects us, the infected body cells release messenger substances known as type 1 interferons. These attract our killer cells, which kill the infected cells.

New Research: Protein identified as potential Achilles’ heel of coronavirus | Explained News,The Indian Express

Scientists have made a significant breakthrough in discovering how the SARS-CoV-2 virus infiltrates human cells, and provokes them into producing proteins that enable it to spread through the human body.Scientists have made a significant breakthrough in discovering how the SARS-CoV-2 virus infiltrates human cells, and provokes them into producing proteins that enable it to spread through the human body.

Our experts answer: Can an air conditioning unit spread COVID-19? What is a superspreader? How do we achieve herd immunity?

COVID questions: AC, superspreaders, herd immunity

Now the idea of 'cross immunity' among the broader population is gaining some groundNow the idea of 'cross immunity' among the broader population is gaining some ground

Covid-19: Could it be burning out after 20% of a population is infected? | Dhaka Tribune

The researchers from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in the US and the Oxford University found that the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine protects the macaques from COVID-19 pneumonia.The researchers from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in the US and the Oxford University found that the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine protects the macaques from COVID-19 pneumonia.

Oxford Vaccine Shows Protection Against Covid-19 in Monkeys: Study

A new study published in the journal Nature finds some people could have immunity to novel coronavirus even though they may have never been exposed to the virus. Researchers in Berlin, Germany examined T cells in blood donors, honing in on the CD4 T cells which react in response to the virus. These T cells were found in 83% of patients who had tested positive for COVID-19 but they were also found in 35% of patients who had not been found positive.A new study published in the journal Nature finds some people could have immunity to novel coronavirus even though they may have never been exposed to the virus. Researchers in Berlin, Germany examined T cells in blood donors, honing in on the CD4 T cells which react in response to the virus. These T cells were found in 83% of patients who had tested positive for COVID-19 but they were also found in 35% of patients who had not been found positive.

Some people who haven't had COVID-19 could have immunity study finds | WZTV

Some people who haven't had COVID-19 could have immunity study finds

Coronaviruses are zoonotic viruses that jump from animals to humans and cause infection. There are many types of common human coronaviruses, which usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. Most people get infected with one or more of coronavirus types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1 at some point in their lives.Coronaviruses are zoonotic viruses that jump from animals to humans and cause infection. There are many types of common human coronaviruses, which usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. Most people get infected with one or more of coronavirus types 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1 at some point in their lives.

Relatives of SARS-CoV-2 may pose a health threat for years to come

Research has reported troubling news that the virus that causes COVID-19 may have mutated in such a way to make it more transmissible.Research has reported troubling news that the virus that causes COVID-19 may have mutated in such a way to make it more transmissible.

How many COVID-19 virus mutations are there? - AOL Lifestyle

Todd Castoe, associate professor of biology at The University of Texas at Arlington, has co-authored two papers regarding the COVID-19 virus and its...Todd Castoe, associate professor of biology at The University of Texas at Arlington, has co-authored two papers regarding the COVID-19 virus and its...

UTA biologists: COVID-19 virus originated in bats, not dogs | Mirage News

Inside his laboratory at Washington State University, Michael Letko is determined to give the world a leg up on the next pandemic.

Bracing for the next pandemic | WSU Insider | Washington State University

In a recent research, scientists have found that people who have been infected with the strains of coronaviruses that cause the common cold may have immunity against the novel coronavirus.

A Recent Bout of Common Cold May Have Provided You COVID-19 Immunity: Study

More viruses with the potential to infect humans are circulating in the mammalsMore viruses with the potential to infect humans are circulating in the mammals

Coronaviruses had circulated in bats for decades- The New Indian Express

Some people might have T-cells that are able to recognize and fight the coronavirus.

Study: Memory of disease-fighting cells could explain partial immunity to COVID-19 - silive.com

People infected with Covid-19 do show an immune response to the virus, but the bad news is we don't know how long that response lastsPeople infected with Covid-19 do show an immune response to the virus, but the bad news is we don't know how long that response lasts

Here's everything we know about coronavirus immunity so far | WIRED UK

Can prior exposure to random coronaviruses help protect against the more lethal novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19? A new study out of Germany points to the tantalizing possibility.Can prior exposure to random coronaviruses help protect against the more lethal novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19? A new study out of Germany points to the tantalizing possibility.

'Common cold' coronavirus exposure could help in COVID-19: study - New York Daily News

New research has discovered T cells in people not yet exposed to the coronavirus, indicating that some people may have preexisting COVID immunity.New research has discovered T cells in people not yet exposed to the coronavirus, indicating that some people may have preexisting COVID immunity.

Why You May Actually Already Be Safe From COVID, New Study Says

A COVID-19 vaccine developed by health care giant Johnson & Johnson and researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has shown promise in a study with rhesus macaque monkeys and has entered an early-stage clinical trial in people.A COVID-19 vaccine developed by health care giant Johnson & Johnson and researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has shown promise in a study with rhesus macaque monkeys and has entered an early-stage clinical trial in people.

COVID-19 vaccine developed by Beth Israel and Johnson & Johnson enters early-stage trials - The Boston Globe

Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) show that some healthy individuals possess immune cells capable of recognizing the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2. ...

Could prior exposure to common cold viruses affect the severity of SARS-CoV-2 symptoms?

Research suggests a close ancestor of the coronavirus emerged in bats more than 40 years ago.Research suggests a close ancestor of the coronavirus emerged in bats more than 40 years ago.

Covid-19: Infectious coronaviruses 'circulating in bats for decades' - BBC News

The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen — possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that person does get COVID-19, a new study suggests. The study, published in the journal Nature on Wednesday, found that among a sample

Why some people who haven't had COVID-19 might already have some immunity - Local News 8

The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen — possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that person does get Covid-19, a new study suggests. The study, published in the journal Nature on Wednesday, found that among a sample […]The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen — possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that…

Some people who haven’t had COVID-19 could already have some immunity; here’s why | KTLA

The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen — possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that…

Some people who haven’t had COVID-19 could already have some immunity; here’s why | KTLA

The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen -- possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that person does get Covid-19, a new study suggests.The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen — possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that…

Why some people who haven’t had COVID-19 might already have some immunity | KFOR.com Oklahoma City

The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen -- possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that person does get COVID-19, a new study suggests.The immune systems of some people who have not been exposed to the novel coronavirus could have some familiarity with the pathogen -- possibly helping to reduce the severity of illness if that person does get COVID-19, a new study suggests.

Why some people who haven't had COVID-19 might already have some immunity | abc7.com