1. Ticks choose humans over dogs in warmer temperatures  Guardian News
  2. Dog ticks prefer humans as hosts when temperatures rise  Livescience.com
  3. Deadly ticks develop a taste for humans over dogs when exposed to warmer temperatures, study reveals  Daily Mail
  4. Deadly ticks bite man, not his best friend, when temperatures rise, study shows  Malay Mail
  5. Study finds ticks choose humans over dogs when temperature rises  The Guardian
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
NEW YORK, Nov 17 — A type of deadly tick that bites dogs is more than twice as likely to feed on humans as temperatures rise, researchers said on Monday, underlining the health risks of climate change. Ticks that cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), which can be fatal, were 2.5 times more...NEW YORK, Nov 17 — A type of deadly tick that bites dogs is more than twice as likely to feed on humans as temperatures rise, researchers said on Monday, underlining the health risks of climate change. Ticks that cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), which can be fatal, were 2.5 times more...

Deadly ticks bite man, not his best friend, when temperatures rise, study shows | Life | Malay Mail

The findings are an ominous sign of how climate change may increase people's risk of contracting tick-borne diseases. The findings are an ominous sign of how climate change may increase people's risk of contracting tick-borne diseases.

Dog ticks prefer humans as hosts when temperatures rise | Live Science

When temperatures rise, the brown dog tick, which carries the bacteria causing the disease, is more than twice as likely to shift its feeding preference from dogs to humans, say researchers from the University of California, DavisWhen temperatures rise, the brown dog tick, which carries the bacteria causing the disease, is more than twice as likely to shift its feeding preference from dogs to humans, say researchers from the University of California, Davis

Warming Planet Ups Risk of Deadly Tick-Borne Fever

Ticks that cause the deadly Rocky Mountain spotted fever are twice as likely to prefer humans over dogs when temperatures rise, highlighting the effects of climate change on health.Ticks that cause the deadly Rocky Mountain spotted fever are twice as likely to prefer humans over dogs when temperatures rise, highlighting the effects of climate change on health.

Deadly ticks develop a taste for humans over dogs when exposed to warmer temperatures, study reveals | Daily Mail Online