1. Enzyme in babies’ blood linked to risk of sudden infant death syndrome  The Guardian
  2. World First Breakthrough Could Prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)  SciTechDaily
  3. Researchers in Australia say they've found why infants die from SIDS  10 Tampa Bay
  4. Study finds link to SIDS for possible infant screening test  FierceBiotech
  5. New study could help explain sudden infant death syndrome  ABC News
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
Scientists find babies who died from Sids had lower levels of BChE on average, but say link ‘needs more investigation’Scientists find babies who died from Sids had lower levels of BChE on average, but say link ‘needs more investigation’

Enzyme in babies’ blood linked to risk of sudden infant death syndrome | Sudden infant death syndrome | The Guardian

After years of research, Dr Carmel Harrington is a step closer to preventing more babies from dying of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) like her son Damien. She says the discovery of a marker that could lead to a screening test is her Mother's Day gift.After years of research, Dr Carmel Harrington is a step closer to preventing more babies from dying of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) like her son Damien. She says the discovery of a marker that could lead to a screening test is her Mother's Day gift.

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Editor’s note: This story has been updated to clarify existing medical advice on avoiding SIDS (WTVO) — A groundbreaking medical study has uncovered the possible cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. SIDS is the unexplained death of a seemingly healthy baby less than a year old, usually while the baby is asleep. Its cause has long […]Editor’s note: This story has been updated to clarify existing medical advice on avoiding SIDS (WTVO) — A groundbreaking medical study has uncovered the possible cause of Sudden Infant Death …

Groundbreaking study uncovers possible cause of infant deaths from SIDS | MyStateline.com

Researchers from The Children's Hospital Westmead in Sydney, Australia released a study that confirmed not only how infants die from sudden infant death syndrome, but why. Researchers from The Children's Hospital Westmead in Sydney, Australia released a study that confirmed not only how infants die from sudden infant death syndrome, but why. 

Researchers Pinpoint Reason Infants Die From SIDS | BioSpace

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The loss of a child brings unimaginable heartbreak.The loss of a child brings unimaginable heartbreak.

Study may help identify SIDS cause | WJMN - UPMatters.com

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Researchers at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney have discovered an enzyme that could help to identify babies who are more at risk of developing sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).Researchers at The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney have discovered an enzyme that could help to identify babies who are more at risk of developing sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

New enzyme marker could identify babies at higher risk of SIDS

Australian researchers have found the activity of an enzyme is significantly lower in babies who die of SIDS Australian researchers have found the activity of an enzyme is significantly lower in babies who die of SIDS

Groundbreaking new study finds possible cause of sudden infant death syndrome | The Independent

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Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) enzyme had lower activity in babies that died of SIDS compared to babies that didn't.Researchers in Sydney believe they have found the biomarker for sudden infant death syndrome.

Australian researchers find possible biomarker for SIDS | Washington Examiner

A team of Australian researchers have identified a biochemical marker in the blood that could help identify newborn babies at risk for sudden infant death syndrome, ...A team of Australian researchers have identified a biochemical marker in the blood that could help identify newborn babies at risk for sudden infant death syndrome, ...

Blood marker found for SIDS risk babies | Shepparton News

A researcher who lost her own child to SIDS has made a discovery that could help other parents avoid the same fate. A team led by Australian scientist Carmel Harrington has found...Babies who die of the syndrome have lower levels of a particular enzyme, says new study

Researchers Make 'Breakthrough' SIDS Finding

Scientists claim to have found the cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), a “world-first breakthrough” that has the potential to someday reduce the Scientists claim to have found a cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), a “world-first breakthrough” that has the potential to someday reduce the nu

Possible Cause Of "Cot Death" Uncovered By Breakthrough Study | IFLScience

Researchers in Australia think babies who die of SIDS have low levels of an enzyme called butyrycholinesterase that’s important to breathing and arousing from sleep. Read more about keeping babies safe while they sleep.Researchers in Australia think babies who die of SIDS have low levels of an enzyme important to breathing and arousing from sleep

Why do babies die from SIDS? Study may show cause of sudden infant deaths - Deseret News

A medical research breakthrough might have just solved the mystery of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).A medical research breakthrough might have just solved the mystery of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Groundbreaking new study finds possible explanation for SIDS

Kaori Ando/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A new study is offering new clues in solving the medical mystery of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), which causes over 1,000 infant deaths per year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The study, led by researchers in Australia and published this week in the medical journal eBioMedicine, found that babies who died due to SIDS had lower levels of an enzyme known as Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The previously unidentified enzyme is thought to be involved in the brain pathways that drive a person to take a breath, according to ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton, a board-certified OBGYN. "Potentially, this would represent a target for intervention," Ashton said Friday on ABC's Good Morning America. "If you could screen babies and found they had a low enzyme level, potentially you could improve that." Currently, there is no method to know an infant's risk for SIDS, which is defined as the unexplained death of a baby younger than the age of 1. In most cases, a SIDS death occurs while a baby is sleeping. Because of the risk of SIDS, medical experts, including the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), recommend that parent and caregivers place infants to sleep on their back, practice room-sharing without bed-sharing, avoid any soft objects or bedding in a baby's sleep area and use only firm sleep surfaces such as a crib, bassinet or pack-and-play. The AAP offers these additional sleep safety recommendations for babies: 1. Until their first birthday, babies should sleep on their backs for all sleep times -- for naps and at night. "We know babies who sleep on their backs are much less likely to die of SIDS than babies who sleep on their stomachs or sides. The problem with the side position is that the baby can roll more easily onto the stomach. Some parents worry that babies will choke when on their backs, but the baby's airway anatomy and the gag reflex will keep that from happening. Even babies with gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) should sleep on their backs." 2. Use a firm sleep surface. "A crib, bassinet, portable crib, or play yard that meets the safety standards of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is recommended along with a tight-fitting, firm mattress and fitted sheet designed for that particular product. Nothing else should be in the crib except for the baby. A firm surface is a hard surface; it should not indent when the baby is lying on it. Bedside sleepers that meet CPSC safety standards may be an option, but there are no published studies that have examined the safety of these products. In addition, some crib mattresses and sleep surfaces are advertised to reduce the risk of SIDS. There is no evidence that this is true, but parents can use these products if they meet CPSC safety standards." 3. Keep baby's sleep area in the same room where you sleep for the first 6 months or, ideally, for the first year. "Place your baby's crib, bassinet, portable crib, or play yard in your bedroom, close to your bed. The AAP recommends room sharing because it can decrease the risk of SIDS by as much as 50% and is much safer than bed sharing. In addition, room sharing will make it easier for you to feed, comfort, and watch your baby." 4. Only bring your baby into your bed to feed or comfort. "Place your baby back in his or her own sleep space when you are ready to go to sleep. If there is any possibility that you might fall asleep, make sure there are no pillows, sheets, blankets, or any other items that could cover your baby's face, head, and neck, or overheat your baby. As soon as you wake up, be sure to move the baby to his or her own bed ... Bed-sharing is not recommended for any babies." 5. Never place your baby to sleep on a couch, sofa, or armchair. "This is an extremely dangerous place for your baby to sleep." 6. Keep soft objects, loose bedding and other items out of the baby's sleep area. "These include pillows, quilts, comforters, sheepskins, blankets, toys, bumper pads or similar products that attach to crib slats or sides. If you are worried about your baby getting cold, you can use infant sleep clothing, such as a wearable blanket. In general, your baby should be dressed with only one layer more than you are wearing." 7. Swaddle your baby safely. "However, make sure that the baby is always on his or her back when swaddled. The swaddle should not be too tight or make it hard for the baby to breathe or move his or her hips. When your baby looks like he or she is trying to roll over, you should stop swaddling." 8. Try giving a pacifier at nap time and bedtime. "This helps reduce the risk of SIDS, even if it falls out after the baby is asleep. If you are breastfeeding, wait until breastfeeding is going well before offering a pacifier. This usually takes 2-3 weeks. If you are not breastfeeding your baby, you can start the pacifier whenever you like. It's OK if your baby doesn't want a pacifier. You can try offering again later, but some babies simply don't like them. If the pacifier falls out after your baby falls asleep, you don't have to put it back." Copyright © 2022, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.Kaori Ando/Getty Images (NEW YORK) — A new study is offering new clues in solving the medical mystery of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), which causes over 1,000 infant deaths per year in the United States, according

New study's findings could help explain sudden infant death syndrome | MyCentralOregon.com

The groundbreaking SIDS research found that a lack of a specific enzyme explains why some babies dies in their sleep.The groundbreaking SIDS research found that a lack of a specific enzyme explains why some babies dies in their sleep.

Researchers say they’ve found the reason why infants die from SIDS - National | Globalnews.ca

A breakthrough study in Australia has determined the cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, a discovery that could save lives in the future.A breakthrough study in Australia has determined the cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, a discovery that could save lives in the future.

A Mourning Mom And Scientist Has Likely Pinpointed The Cause Of SIDS

Babies at risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) could be identified through a biochemical marker, a new study finds.Babies at risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) could be identified through a biochemical marker, a new study finds.

SIDS breakthrough? Possible sudden infant death syndrome biomarker identified | Fox News

Sydney researchers have made a world-first breakthrough to identify babies more at risk of Sudden Infant De...

Sydney researchers make 'world-first breakthrough' in preventing SIDS

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Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is one of leading causes of infant death and a team of researchers in Australia have now identified the first blood biomarker linked to brain arousal that could potentially be used to identify infants most at risk.Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is one of leading causes of infant death and until now researchers have not been able to identify any specific physiological factor that may make a baby more vulnerable. A team of researchers in Australia have now identified a blood biomarker linked to brain arousal that could potentially be used to identify infants most at risk of SIDS.

Landmark study finds first biomarker to detect babies at risk of SIDS

SIDS usually happens when infants die in their sleep without any particular reason. Researchers now know a cause.Sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, usually happens when infants die in their sleep without any particular reason. Researchers say they now know a cause.

Report: Researchers find why infants die from SIDS | kvue.com

The new discovery counters decades of medical advice to parents to lay babies on their backs and to keep toys and blankets out of the crib.A groundbreaking medical study has uncovered the possible cause of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Groundbreaking study uncovers possible cause of infant death

Researchers at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead (CHW) have made a ground-breaking discovery, identifying the first biochemical marker that could help detect babies more at risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) while they are alive. In a study published on May 6, 2022, by The Lancet’s eBi

World First Breakthrough Could Prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

World First Breakthrough Could Prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

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Groundbreaking Discovery Reveals Possible Cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome - NowThis