Next COVID-19 Drug Target: Viral “Molecular Scissor”  SciTechDailyView Full coverage on Google News
Coronavirus uses enzymatic cutter for virus production and to disable essential immune proteins. American and Polish scientists, reporting October 16, 2020, in the journal Science Advances, laid out a novel rationale for COVID-19 drug design — blocking a molecular "scissor" that the virus uses fo

Next COVID-19 Drug Target: Viral “Molecular Scissor”

Reports suggest timeframe between recovery and reinfection ‘relatively short’ for those who contracted virus twice Reports suggest timeframe between recovery and reinfection ‘relatively short’ for those who contracted virus twice

Covid reinfections 'to be expected' as virus spreads, say government scientists | Coronavirus | The Guardian

Not until we have a vaccineNot until we have a vaccine

OP-ED: Can we learn to live with coronavirus? | Dhaka Tribune

An international team of researchers studied the three lethal coronaviruses SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV in order to identify commonly hijacked cellular pathways and detect promising targets for broad coronavirus inhibition.An international team of researchers studied the three lethal coronaviruses SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV in order to identify commonly hijacked cellular pathways and detect promising targets for broad coronavirus inhibition.

International Team of Scientists Identifies Common Vulnerabilities Across Coronaviruses | UC San Francisco

New evidence suggests that people who have had COVID-19 may be immune to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes it, for at least 5–7 months, if not longer.New evidence suggests that people who have had COVID-19 may be immune to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes it, for at least 5–7 months, if not longer.

SARS-CoV-2 antibodies may provide immunity for at least 5–7 months

Here are pandemic highlights for the weekHere are pandemic highlights for the week

Coronavirus News Roundup: October 10-October 16 - Scientific American

(HealthDay)—A case of reinfection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is described in a study published online Oct. 12 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 described in 25-year-old

Sage and the two fatal errorsSage and the two fatal errors

Sage and the two fatal errors | The Conservative Woman

Scientists from the University of Sheffield are working with almost 200 researchers from around the globe to identify vulnerabilities in three lethal coronaviruses—including SARS-CoV-2 responsible for ...

Scientists identify common vulnerabilities in COVID-19 and other lethal coronaviruses

The researchers, including those from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) in the US, developed two molecules that inhibit the molecular The researchers, including those from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UT Health San Antonio) in the US, developed two molecules that inhibit the molecular "scissor" enzyme used by the coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2-PLpro.

Scientists develop new method to block coronavirus replication

Experts developed a method that blocks a protein that the virus uses to cut and disable important components of our immune system, and also to produce copies of itself.Experts developed a method that blocks a protein that the virus uses to cut and disable important components of our immune system, and also to produce copies of itself.

Scientists find new way to stop coronavirus from replicating itself - SCIENCE News

A recent study found that nitric oxide which is a cell-signaling molecule produced by the human body naturally may be a potential treatment for coronavirusA recent study found that nitric oxide which is a cell-signaling molecule produced by the human body naturally may be a potential treatment for coronavirus

GREAT NEWS: Nitric Oxide, An Effective Antiviral Treatment, Can Cure COVID-19 Patients, And Save Lives Until The COVID-19 Vaccine Arrives! | Inventiva

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Read more about Scientists develop new method to block coronavirus replication: Report on Business Standard. Scientists have laid out an approach to block a protein that the novel coronavirus uses to cut and disable crucial components of the immune system and to produce copies of itselfScientists have laid out an approach to block a protein that the novel coronavirus uses to cut and disable crucial components of the immune system and to produce copies of itself

Scientists develop new method to block coronavirus replication: Report | Business Standard News

Commentary highlights importance, recommends steps to continuing surgical practice during pandemic.Commentary highlights importance, recommends steps to continuing surgical practice during pandemic.

Elective Surgery in the Time of COVID-19 | Contagion Live

This document provides guidance for planning the discharge and ending of isolation of COVID-19 patients.This document provides guidance for planning the discharge and ending of isolation of COVID-19 patients.

Guidance for discharge and ending of isolation of people with COVID-19

There are common vulnerabilities among three lethal coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV, such as frequently hijacked cellular pathways, that could lead to promising targets for broad coronavirus ...

Global study identifies common vulnerabilities across SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS coronaviruses

One of China's front-running coronavirus vaccine candidates was shown to be safe and triggered immune responses in a combined early and mid-stage test in humans, researchers said.One of China's front-running coronavirus vaccine candidates was shown to be safe and triggered immune responses in a combined early and mid-stage test in humans, researchers said.

Coronavirus vaccine candidate from China's CNBG shows promise in human test, study shows | Reuters

A new article by Columbia Mailman School researchers Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti explores the potential for the COVID-19 virus to become endemic, a regular feature producing recurring outbreaks in ...

Will the COVID-19 virus become endemic?

In a recent paper available on the bioRxiv preprint server, US researchers show that individual particles of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) undergo structural destabilization at relatively mild but elevated temperatures – strengthening the case for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) resurgence in the winter.In a recent paper available on the bioRxiv preprint server, US researchers show that individual particles of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) undergo structural destabilization at relatively mild but elevated temperatures – strengthening the case for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) resurgence in the winter.

Study links SARS-CoV-2 seasonality to increased spread at lower temperatures

Findings provide 'cautious optimism' that a COVID-19 vaccine would be expected to work as well in people with diabetes as those without.Findings provide 'cautious optimism' that a COVID-19 vaccine would be expected to work as well in people with diabetes as those without.

COVID-19 Antibody Response Not Reduced With Diabetes

University of Nevada, Reno engineers and virologists have teamed up for novel approach to COVID-19 testing.University of Nevada, Reno engineers and virologists have teamed up for novel approach to COVID-19 testing.

COVID-19 rapid test has successful lab results, research moves to next stages

We will be spending more time indoors this winter and airborne transmission means the risk of the virus spreading is even greaterWe will be spending more time indoors this winter and airborne transmission means the risk of the virus spreading is even greater

Why airborne transmission of Covid-19 will increase this winter

The first thing that comes to mind in Covid-19 times is how to keep us safe from the SARS-CoV-2 infection that may or may not be around us. This constant fear would not help us do any better if we keep ourselves away from the most likely possibilities of catching the virus. Here's a list of risks that can help you gauge the severity of coronavirus attack. Know betterThe first thing that comes to mind in Covid-19 times is how to keep us safe from the SARS-CoV-2 infection that may or may not be around us. This constant fear would not help us do any better if we keep ourselves away from the most likely possibilities of catching the virus. Here's a list of risks that can help you gauge the severity of coronavirus attack. Know better

Find out what all can give you coronavirus - Know better | The Economic Times

While the latest study furthers our understanding of how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with surfaces, its observations are not enough to warrant a change in prescribed hygiene and safety protocols.While the latest study furthers our understanding of how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with surfaces, its observations are not enough to warrant a change in prescribed hygiene and safety protocols.

Fresh hope of a Covid-19 vaccine has emerged from a new trial showing an experimental Chinese jab is "safe and elicits an antibody response" to fight the virus.Fresh hope of a Covid-19 vaccine has emerged from a new trial showing an experimental Chinese jab is "safe and elicits an antibody response" to fight the virus.

Chinese vaccine trial offers fresh hope in war against pandemic - Independent.ie

Co-infection will cause more severe pathological changes in the lungs, say researchersCo-infection will cause more severe pathological changes in the lungs, say researchers

Alert over influenza and Covid in winter - Telegraph India

During a typical day, we touch the surfaces of many different objects, often without noticing: Money, phones, door handles, elevator buttons, cups, desks, keyboards, petrol pumps and shopping trolleys.During a typical day, we touch the surfaces of many different objects, often without noticing: Money, phones, door handles, elevator buttons, cups, desks, keyboards, petrol pumps and shopping trolleys.

How worried should you be about news the coronavirus survives on surfaces for up to 28 days?

A new article by Columbia Mailman School researchers Jeffrey Shaman and Marta Galanti explores the potential for the COVID-19 virus to become endemic, a regular feature producing recurring outbreaks in humans. They identify crucial contributing factors, including the risk for reinfection, vaccine availability and efficacy, as well as potential seasonality and interactions with other viral infections that may modulate the transmission of the virus.

Will the COVID-19 Virus Become Endemic? | Columbia Public Health